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What is the significance of the pinwheel thingy that appeared in the safe with old man Fischer's will? Is it just a sentimental symbol of some (unexplained) aspect of Fischer's childhood that adds emotional impact to the inception?

For Fischer, finding that pinwheel in the safe is the proof that he mattered to his father. The actions and decisions that proceed from knowing that he was loved, valued, and accepted will differ from those that might be made by a bitter man who feels like a disappointment to his father.

Ong Jc commented 2010-08-15 03:12:01 UTC
It was a symbol of his happy memories and good relationship with his father when he was young, as we can see from the photo.
rextutor asked the question 2010-08-15 03:47:10 UTC view / hide
rextutor improved the question 2010-08-15 04:06:05 UTC view / hide
rextutor commented 2010-08-15 05:50:31 UTC
Pausing the dvd on the photo of Fischer and pinwheel and his father shows you are correct. Thanks,Ong Jc. That shot is brief and I missed the pinwheel, even after watching the dvd. It is an interesting plot element informing us that as a child, Fischer had been happier, and that his relationship with his father had been closer. The discovery of the pinwheel in the safe would indeed have been emotionally powerful; a good thing for Fischer, and also a good thing for Saito and team as it solidified the inception.
topfall commented 2010-08-15 15:41:27 UTC
For Fischer, finding that pinwheel in the safe is the proof that he mattered to his father. The actions and decisions that proceed from knowing that he was loved, valued, and accepted will differ from those that might be made by a bitter man who feels like a disappointment to his father.
topfall provided an answer 2010-08-15 19:41:34 UTC view / hide
rextutor commented 2010-08-16 01:12:28 UTC
Thanks Topfall. Even more revealing and on point than what we have already discussed. Such validation might very well lead to "catharsis," which I seem to recall was one of the terms used by the team during planning to describe a successful inception. I'll see if I can spot the discussion about catharsis next time.

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